Stayin Alive The 1970s And The Last Days Of The Working Class Pdf

stayin alive the 1970s and the last days of the working class pdf

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Where does the New Deal fit in the big picture of American history? What does it mean for us today? What happened to the economic equality it once engendered?

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: Cowie Published Political Science, Geography. Excerpt] What many pegged as the promise of a working-class revival in the early s turned out to be more of a swan song by decade's end.

Stayin' alive : the 1970s and the last days of the working class

Explore a new genre. Burn through a whole series in a weekend. Let Grammy award-winning narrators transform your commute. Broaden your horizonswith an entire library, all your own. Cowie Free download, epub, docs, New York Times, ppt, audio books, Bloomberg, NYT, books to read, good books to read, cheap books, good books,online books, books online, book reviews, read books online, books to read online, online library, greatbooks to read, best books to read, top books to read Stayin' Alive: The s and the Last Days of the Working Class by JeffersonR. Cowie books to read online. Search this site.

Introduction to Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours. Finding libraries that hold this item Dionne"Gives the best sense of the way that it felt to live through the decade Cowie's book captures the contradictory nature of the s politics better than almost any other ever written about the period. Thompson's Making of the English Working Class. You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

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Winner of the Merle Curti award, an epic account that recasts the s as the key turning point in modern U. Jefferson Cowie is a professor of labor history and the chair of the department of labor relations, law, and history at Cornell University. The New Press is a nonprofit public-interest book publisher. Your gift will support The New Press in continuing to leverage books for social change.

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With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts. Jefferson Cowie. The New Press. An epic account of how middle-class America hit the rocks in the political and economic upheavals of the s OverDrive uses cookies and similar technologies to improve your experience, monitor our performance, and understand overall usage trends for OverDrive services including OverDrive websites and apps.

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Access options available:. As a cultural and political force, Jefferson Cowie argues that the relatively short-lived phenomenon of a unified idea or ideal of the working class came undone in the s from not just external factors but also its own inner struggles. Replete with engaging cultural references, political discussions, and a continual emphasis on the social realities for working Americans, this is an important book for historians of labour, the working class and postwar politics more generally. Part One, roughly stretching from to , is replete with engagement with the working class by political leaders and cultural producers with the working class as they recognized its potential power and emphasized its significance for better or worse. This campaign infighting saw working people split their votes between McGovern and Nixon, weakening the traditional relationship between labour and the Democratic Party.

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