Importance Of Philosophy Of Education In Teaching And Learning Pdf

importance of philosophy of education in teaching and learning pdf

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This introductory article explains the coverage of this book, which is about the philosophical aspects of education.

Philosophy of education

This introductory article explains the coverage of this book, which is about the philosophical aspects of education. It explains that the philosophy of education is the branch of philosophy that addresses philosophical questions concerning the nature, aims, and problems of education. The book examines the problems concerning the aims and guiding ideals of education. It also explores the problems concerning students' and parents' rights, the best way to understand and conduct moral education, and the character of purported educational ideals.

Keywords: education , philosophy , students' rights , parents' rights , moral education , educational ideals. Philosophy of education is that branch of philosophy that addresses philosophical questions concerning the nature, aims, and problems of education. As a branch of practical philosophy, its practitioners look both inward to the parent discipline of philosophy and outward to educational practice, as well as to developmental psychology, cognitive science more generally, sociology, and other relevant disciplines.

The most basic problem of philosophy of education is that concerning aims: what are the proper aims and guiding ideals of education? A related question concerns evaluation: what are the appropriate criteria for evaluating educational efforts, institutions, practices, and products? Other important problems involve the authority of the state and of teachers, and the rights of students and parents; the character of purported educational ideals such as critical thinking, and of purportedly undesirable phenomena such as indoctrination; the best way to understand and conduct moral education; a range of questions concerning teaching, learning, and curriculum; and many others.

All these and more are addressed in the essays that follow. For much of the history of Western philosophy, philosophical questions concerning education were high on the philosophical agenda.

From Socrates, Plato, and p. Peters, and Israel Scheffler, general philosophers i. The same is true of most of the major figures of the Western philosophical tradition, including Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, and many others.

On the face of it, this should not be surprising. For one thing, the pursuit of philosophical questions concerning education is partly dependent upon investigations of the more familiar core areas of philosophy. For example, questions concerning the curriculum routinely depend on epistemology and the philosophies of the various curriculum subjects e. What is it about art that entitles it, if it is so entitled, to a place in the curriculum?

According to what criteria should specific curriculum content be selected? Should all students be taught the same content? To what end should students be taught—if they should be so taught—to reason? Can reasoning be fostered independently of the advocacy, inculcation, or indoctrination of particular beliefs? Should all students be taught in the same manner?

How are permissible teaching practices distinguished from impermissible ones? Is it permissible for schools to be in the business of the formation of students' character, given liberalism's reluctance to endorse particular conceptions of the good? Should schools be constituted as democratic communities?

Do all students have a right to education? If so, to what extent if any is such an education obliged to respect the beliefs of all groups, and what does such respect involve? This sort of dependence on the parent discipline is typical of philosophical questions concerning education. Another, related reason that the philosophical tradition has taken educational matters as a locus of inquiry is that many fundamental questions concerning education—for example, those concerning the aims of education, the character and desirability of liberal education, indoctrination, moral and intellectual virtues, the imagination, authenticity, and other educational matters—are of independent philosophical interest but are intertwined with more standard core areas and issues p.

Given the cognitive state of the very young child, is it possible to avoid indoctrination entirely—and if not, how bad a thing is that? Should education aim at the transmission of existing knowledge or, rather, at fostering the abilities and dispositions conducive to inquiry and the achievement of autonomy? In addition, the pursuit of fundamental questions in more or less all the core areas of philosophy often leads naturally to and is sometimes enhanced by sustained attention to questions about education e.

For these reasons, and perhaps others, it is not surprising that the philosophical tradition has generally regarded education as a worthy and important target of philosophical reflection. It is therefore unfortunate that the pursuit of philosophy of education as an area of philosophical investigation has been largely abandoned by general philosophers in the last decades of the twentieth century, especially in the United States.

Hamlyn, R. Hare, Alasdaire MacIntyre, A. The reasons for this loss are complex and are mainly contingent historical ones that I will not explore here. It remains, nevertheless, that this state of affairs is unfortunate for the health of philosophy of education as an area of philosophical endeavor, and for general philosophy as well. One purpose of this volume is to rectify this situation. The essays that follow are divided in a way that reflects my own, no doubt somewhat idiosyncratic understanding of the contours of the field; other groupings would be equally sensible.

In the first section, concerning the aims of education , Emily p. The next concerns a variety of issues involving thinking, reasoning, teaching, and learning. Richard Feldman discusses epistemological aspects of thinking and reasoning as they are manifested in the educational context. Jonathan Adler offers an account, informed by recent work in cognitive science as well as epistemology, of the nature of fallibility and its educational significance.

Eamonn Callan and Dylan Arena offer an account of indoctrination, while Stefaan Cuypers does the same for authenticity. David Moshman provides a psychological account of the development of rationality, while Gareth Matthews raises doubts concerning the contributions developmental psychology might make to the philosophical understanding of the various cognitive dimensions of education. The third section focuses on moral, value, and character education.

Elijah Millgram focuses on moral skepticism and possible attendant limits of moral education. Graham Oddie offers a metaphysical account of value as part of a general approach to values education. The next section treats issues arising at the intersection of knowledge, curriculum, and educational research. David Carr addresses general questions concerning the extent to which, and the ways in which, the curriculum is and ought to be driven by our views of knowledge.

Robert Audi and Richard Grandy both address questions concerning science education—the first focusing on the ways in which religious toleration and liberal neutrality might constrain science education, and the second on contemporary cognitive scientific investigations of teaching and learning in the science classroom.

Denis Phillips assesses extant philosophical critiques of educational research and discusses the scientific status, current state, and future promise of such research. The fifth section addresses social and political issues concerning education. Amy Gutmann and Meira Levinson both address contentious questions concerning education in the contemporary circumstances of multiculturalism, while Lawrence Blum treats the problematic character and effects of prejudice and the prospects for overcoming them.

Rob Reich investigates the moral and legal legitimacy of some varieties of educational authority, emphasizing the important but often overlooked interests of children.

The final section includes three papers that discuss particular approaches to philosophy of education: Randall Curren considers pragmatic approaches to the subject, Nel Noddings feminist approaches, and Nicholas Burbules postmodern approaches. All three provide useful overviews of and also critically address the promise of and problems facing the target approaches. All of these chapters exhibit both the deep and genuinely philosophical character of philosophical questions concerning education, and the benefits to be gained by sustained attention, by students and philosophers alike, to those questions.

Most of them are written by distinguished general philosophers; they reflect both a sophisticated mastery of the core areas of philosophy to which these authors have made independent important contributions and a deep grasp of the significance of philosophical questions concerning education.

All of them exemplify the benefits to be derived from a fruitful interaction between philosophy of education and the parent discipline. The time is right for philosophy of education to regain its rightful place in the world of general philosophy. And it is for this reason that I am especially pleased to have been involved in the present project. Happily, there have been some positive developments on this score in recent years, as well as some honorable exceptions to the general neglect of philosophy of education in recent decades by the community of general philosophers.

Archambault, Reginald D. Philosophical Analysis and Education. Find this resource:. Curren, Randall a. Craig pp. London: Routledge. Doyle, James F. Educational Judgments: Papers in the Philosophy of Education. Frankena, William K. Hamlyn, D. Experience and the Growth of Understanding. Langford, Glenn, and D. O'Connor, eds. New Essays in the Philosophy of Education. The Monist General Topic: Philosophy of Education.

Monist Phillips, D. Philosophers on Education: New Historical Perspectives. Scheffler, Israel, ed. Philosophy and Education: Modern Readings. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. The Language of Education. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Chicago: Scott Foresman. Reason and Teaching. Indianapolis: Hackett. Siegel, Harvey Forthcoming in Encyclopaedia Britannica , print version. For more detailed depictions of the field, see Curren b , Phillips , and Siegel For contemporary assessments of the contributions to philosophy of education of these and other figures, made by an impressive roster of contemporary general philosophers, see Rorty A fine brief survey is provided in Curren a.

Phillips section 1.

Introduction: Philosophy of Education and Philosophy

The philosophy of education examines the goals, forms, methods, and meaning of education. The term is used to describe both fundamental philosophical analysis of these themes and the description or analysis of particular pedagogical approaches. Considerations of how the profession relates to broader philosophical or sociocultural contexts may be included. For example, philosophers of education study what constitutes upbringing and education, the values and norms revealed through upbringing and educational practices, the limits and legitimization of education as an academic discipline, and the relation between educational theory and practice. In universities, the philosophy of education usually forms part of departments or colleges of education. Plato's educational philosophy was grounded in a vision of an ideal Republic wherein the individual was best served by being subordinated to a just society due to a shift in emphasis that departed from his predecessors. The mind and body were to be considered separate entities.

Philosophy of education , philosophical reflection on the nature, aims, and problems of education. The philosophy of education is Janus -faced, looking both inward to the parent discipline of philosophy and outward to educational practice. This dual focus requires it to work on both sides of the traditional divide between theory and practice, taking as its subject matter both basic philosophical issues e. These practical issues in turn have implications for a variety of long-standing philosophical problems in epistemology , metaphysics , ethics , and political philosophy. In addressing these many issues and problems, the philosopher of education strives for conceptual clarity, argumentative rigour, and informed valuation. The history of philosophy of education is an important source of concerns and issues—as is the history of education itself—for setting the intellectual agenda of contemporary philosophers of education.

Your teaching philosophy is a self-reflective statement of your beliefs about teaching and learning. It's a one to two page narrative that conveys your core ideas about being an effective teacher in the context of your discipline. It develops these ideas with specific, concrete examples of what the teacher and learners will do to achieve those goals. Importantly, your teaching philosophy statement also explains why you choose these options. Your reasons for writing a teaching philosophy may vary.

Introduction: Philosophy of Education and Philosophy

The rationale for making particular teaching choices becomes more apparent when new faculty members reflect on what they believe about teaching and learning. Much of what faculty believe comes from their own experiences as a student, the images of teaching they hold, and their experiences as a teacher. There is, however, a body of research on teaching and learning that may serve faculty well as they hone their teaching craft.

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Why Is It Important For Teachers to Study Philosophy of Education

Teachers are mentors and play an active role in inculcating independent thinking in students. However, to do that as a teacher, you must have a teaching philosophy of your own. Students always look up to their teacher and therefore, it becomes necessary for you to have thoughts to inspire them. Here are specific reasons why you should Study Philosophy of Education if you are a teacher. One may feel lost without a map.

Они все, как один, - эгоцентристы и маньяки. Если им что нужно, то обязательно еще вчера. Каждый затраханный файл может спасти мир. - И что же из этого следует. - Из этого следует, - Джабба шумно вздохнул, - что Стратмор такой же псих, как и все его сотруднички.

Он, конечно, с легкостью мог набрать код лифта и отправить Сьюзан домой, но она нужна ему. Она должна помочь ему найти ключ в компьютере Хейла. Стратмор пока не сказал ей, что этот ключ представляет для него отнюдь не только академический интерес. Он думал, что сможет обойтись без ее участия - принимая во внимание ее склонность к самостоятельности - и сам найдет этот ключ, но уже столкнулся с проблемами, пытаясь самостоятельно запустить Следопыта. Рисковать еще раз ему не хотелось. - Сьюзан, - в его голосе послышалась решимость, - я прошу тебя помочь мне найти ключ Хейла.


PDF | A nation's policy on education is the government's way of attaining the importance of philosophy for the study and practice of educational Teachers, especially in a society such as Nigeria, where much of the child.


Мидж долго молчала. Джабба услышал в трубке вздох - но не мог сказать, вздох ли это облегчения. - Итак, ты уверен, что врет моя статистика. Джабба рассмеялся. - Не кажется ли тебе, что это звучит как запоздалое эхо.

Сегодня же суббота. Найди себе какого-нибудь парня да развлекись с ним как следует. Она снова вздохнула. - Постараюсь, Джабба. Поверь мне, постараюсь изо всех сил.

Глаза Джаббы по-прежнему выражали шок и растерянность, когда сзади раздался душераздирающий крик: - Джабба. Джабба. Это кричала Соши Кута, его технический ассистент, подбегая к платформе с длиннющей распечаткой в руке. У нее был такой вид, словно она только что увидела призрак. - Джабба! - Соши задыхалась.

Чатрукьян выпрямился и посмотрел .

2 COMMENTS

Johanna K.

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Philosophy means "love of wisdom.

Skowabfecta

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Philosophy of Education has an important role to play in preparing for a career in teaching. Third it enables teachers to understand the scope and limits of empirical research in education and the relationships between that research and conceptual issues in education.

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